FREE Michelangelo Study Resources

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In this post, I explained how we did our Renaissance artist study last spring.  It turns out that one of the resources that we used to study the life of Michelangelo is currently available as a free download here.  There is also a free supplement available about two of his masterpieces – The Pieta and The Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.  You will see the price reduce to $0.00 after you add them to your cart.

If you are planning to do more art history study in the future, you may also be interested in a bundle by the same publisher that is on sale right now, called The Masters and Their Masterpieces.  Do yourself a favor and download the two free items first.  It will give you credit towards your purchase, bringing your total purchase price down to $8.58 for 24 separate lessons, including Da Vinci, Cassatt, Renoir, Degas, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Monet and more!  Since I already own several of the titles that are included, I ended up only paying $4.

Back-to-school sales are awesome, aren’t they?

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Finding Time for Art

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Did you ever begin your homeschool year with grandiose plans for all of the art enrichment that you were going to include on top of your basic subjects?  I have, only to become overwhelmed and then discouraged, feeling that there was no way to fit it all in.  In the early elementary years, you are laying the foundation for skills in reading, math, etc. that you will build upon later.  Taking time away from those areas can make you feel guilty at times.  How can you find time for one without sacrificing the other?

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  1. Farm it out. My children have taken inexpensive (and free) art classes at co-op, museums and our local library.  Some of these activities fall outside of school hours.  The ones that interfere with our typical school day don’t feel like interference when I know that there is the added benefit of getting my kids out of the house to spend time with other children.  If you don’t want to sign up for a long-term commitment where you will be obligated to be there every week, consider classes at your library, which can often be signed up for one session at a time, when it fits into your schedule that week.
  2. Link it to another subject that you are studying. The history curriculum that we use suggests art projects to go along with the chapter that we are studying that week.  This year, we reached a chapter on the Renaissance, and decided it was the perfect time to pause in our book and dedicate some time to learning about some great Renaissance-period artists.  I have some artist biographies, art cards and fine art pages that I have been hoarding for the day that I had time to use them, and I went through and found what was applicable to the time period.  We chose one artist per week, read a biography, viewed examples of their art, and watched YouTube videos about the artist.  When we finished studying all of the artists that we had selected, I picked some of the art cards that we had viewed and wrote the last name of each artist on index cards.  I laid both sets of cards out and had the children match the name of the artist to the art that they had created.  I was pleased to discover that they were able to match them up without much difficulty and enjoyed doing it.
  3. Take a field trip to a museum. Field trips are a great way to add fine art appreciation to your homeschool.  I feel this works best if you have already learned something about the artist whose work you are viewing or the subject matter of the art.  On the other hand, it can also be the jumping off point to spend some time studying the artist when you return home from your trip.
  4. Take advantage of weeks that tend to be less productive. A great time for fine art study is the week before a major holiday or the last week of school, when your children tend to be distracted or you have a lot of your plate.  One year, I found a free Kindle download of a picture study curriculum.  Paintings were provided to observe, discuss and answer questions about.  It kept them engaged while I did some holiday preparations and rounded out what otherwise would have been a short school day.

Don’t give up on those special subjects that you’d like to include in your day.  Be creative about it and you can make it happen!

 

Fine Art Study – The Renaissance

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I have been hoarding artist study materials for a while, as this is something I really want to go over with my children, but often find that it gets put on the back burner.  They really enjoy it when we are able to make time for it, though, so I was glad to find an opportunity to utilize them recently.

We use The Story of the World as our history curriculum for our homeschool.  We are currently on Volume 2:  The Middle Ages.  When we reached the chapter about the Renaissance, I decided this would be the perfect time to incorporate some fine art study into our school year.

First, I pulled out our set of Memoria Press art cards, and picked out the ones that were appropriate for the time period.  We looked at the cards, read the information about the pieces, and discussed which we liked best and why.

Next, I chose some prominent Renaissance artists to focus on – Michelangelo, DaVinci, Rembrandt and Raphael.  I used this timeline to help me narrow the choices down.  I have biographies from the Great Artists Series by homeschool bits for each one, which also include links to online videos and activities about the artist.  We focused on one artist per class.  We read the biography together, answered the review questions, watched some of the links, and viewed examples of the artist’s work.  We used some of our art cards for this, as well as Enrichment Studies art pages (you can receive free art pages from them each month if you become a subscriber).  We also visited the Google Arts & Culture page.  One caution about the Google page – many of the pieces of art on it contain nudity.  My son is not a fan of Michelangelo as a result.  He said, “I understand him painting Adam and Eve naked, but King David wore clothes!”  Oh, well.

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Another source that we used was a series on YouTube called Art with Mati and Dada.  We discovered it a while ago and my children really enjoy it.  We found the episode that went along with the artist we were reviewing that day and I let them finish the lesson by watching it.

When we finished studying all of the artists that I had selected, I picked some of the art cards that we had viewed and wrote the last name of each artist on index cards.  I laid both sets of cards out and had the children match the name of the artist to the art that they had created.  I was pleased to discover that they were able to match them up without much difficulty and had fun doing it.  We hung the matched sets up in our classroom afterward so they can continue to observe them.

I found that tying the study of art into our history lessons worked well.  I didn’t feel like I was taking time away another subject, but was enhancing it instead.

Edited to add:  If you will be studying Renaissance artists with your children next year, I just found out that Enrichment Studies will have a new study on that time period that will be available.  Each week will focus on one artist, and each day there will be a video about the artist and/or their work sent by email.  There will be coordinating Fine Art Pages to have on display in your home during that week as well.  It will give a short, daily dose of art appreciation that’s easy to find time for.